4 Trends In The Tech Industry You Can’t Afford To Overlook

By Serenity Gibbons

It’s a given that no one person is able to keep track of every single tech trend shaping the world today. What was trending yesterday, however, may not hold much importance in the future. A study from Spiceworks found that more than a third of tech budget increases in 2021 will be influenced by Covid-19 related trends.

Over the last several months, priorities have shifted. The tech that scored big headlines and even bigger investments a year ago may not be relevant anymore. By doing some research and uncovering the latest in tech trends, you can stay one step ahead in the coming year and beyond.

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Eleven Important Tech Trends to Expect in 2021

By eWeek Editors

As our latest installment in this year’s eWEEK predictions, we offer insights from two sources: Dave Padmos of EY Americas, and Diego Oppenheimer, CEO of Algorithmia

EY makes EY Diligence Edge, an artificial intelligence platform hosted on IBM Cloud and supported by IBM Watson Discovery, designed to revolutionize the mergers and acquisitions due-diligence process. Algorithmia is a machine-learning model deployment and management solution that automates the MLOps for an organization.

Here are insights for 2021 from thought leaders representing two trendy companies.

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These Tech Startups Want to Sell You Their Life Insurance

By Leslie Scism and Alexandra Bruell

Technology startups are ready to challenge traditional life insurers head on.

Bestow Inc. and Dayforward Inc. are making the leap to become life-insurance carriers, a move away from a model where startups only sell traditional insurers’ policies.

The companies are banking on their versions of online technology for sizing up the risk of insurance…

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It’s Time For Tech To Help Us Understand What’s In The Food We Eat

By Greg Shewmaker

It’s never been easier to find information. Technological advancements have allowed us to quickly dig deep into just about everything we’re interested in, and advances in artificial intelligence and machine language have made information even faster. Yet with all this information available to us, we still can’t answer the most fundamental question of what is actually inside of the food we eat.

Informed Decisions

Data is available for virtually anything we tune our senses to. Apps tell us the names of the songs we can’t get out of our heads, show us the names of the constellations overhead and recognize millions of products just by barcode. Consumers have multitudes of information to help them make the best, most personal choice.

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China’s Leaders Focus on Tech as They Make 5-Year Economic Plan

By Joe McDonald

Chinese leaders met Monday to formulate an economic blueprint for the next five years that is expected to emphasize development of semiconductors and other technology at a time when Washington is cutting off access to U.S. technology.

President Xi Jinping’s government is working to promote self-sustaining growth supported by domestic consumer spending and technology development as tensions with trading partners hamper access to export markets and technology.

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Who’s Hiring And Reskilling In Tech And What Are They Looking For?

By Ilya Brotzky

Covid-19 will permanently wipe out between 6.2 million and 8.7 million jobs in the U.S. by the end of the year. In my home country of Canada, we are still 1 million jobs short of our pre-Covid employment levels. Due to this grim outlook, many are asking: Who’s hiring and what are they looking for? Some innovation-driven sectors are adapting and actually growing a lot during this time which provides signs of hope. 

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Manhattan Emptied Out During the Pandemic. But Big Tech Is Moving In.

By Matthew Haag

Facebook has just leased enough new office space in Manhattan to nearly triple its current local work force, including at one of the city’s most iconic buildings, the 107-year-old former main post office complex near Pennsylvania Station.

Apple, which set up its first office in New York a decade ago, is expanding to another building in Manhattan. And Google and Amazon are stitching together corporate campuses in the city more quickly than anywhere else in the world. Amazon paid roughly $1 billion in March for the iconic Lord & Taylor building on Fifth Avenue.

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