Apple is reportedly developing satellite technology to support its devices

By: James Vincent

new report from Bloomberg claims Apple is working on satellite technology to beam data to users’ devices, and could launch a new initiative using the tech within five years.

There are a lot of unknowns and caveats, though. The project is “still early and could be abandoned,” says Bloomberg, and it’s not clear what Apple’s end goal is. It’s also not known if the company wants to develop its own satellites or simply utilize others’ satellite data.

With the technology in hand, though, the iPhone maker could do a number of useful things. It could improve its maps service and location tracking, or boost mobile reception and internet coverage for its devices, making the firm more independent of carriers.

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Economic development, tech will be focus for incoming council

By: RACHAEL PACELLA

The incoming Bowie City Council has its eye on technology-oriented economic development and incoming Mayor Tim Adams said he would like to see more cyber security businesses in town.

“Too many good citizens in Bowie get in their cars every day and drive to Fort Meade and NSA and D.C.,” Adams said. “It’d be great if we could make sure they didn’t have to drive, and they could work those jobs from here. Because we have no lack of talent in our city.”

As far as talent is concerned, Adams will be joined by three new council members with backgrounds that complement that vision. At-large member Ingrid Harrison is an outreach manager at the county’s workforce development arm, Employ Prince George’s. District 4 Councilwoman Roxy Ndebumadu leads a team at Microsoft that helps federal customers adopt and manage digital innovations. District 3 Councilman Adrian Boafo is the campaign manager for House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer and has worked on Capitol Hill.

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Cannabis legalisation: Teen addiction rate rises by a quarter in some US states

By: Brittany Keogh

The proportion of teenagers addicted to marijuana rose by a quarter after it was legalised in some US states, a major study has found.

US researchers analysed data on cannabis use and harm from more than 500,000 people aged 12 and older in Colorado, Washington, Alaska and Oregon between 2008 and 2016.

While the proportion of 12- to 17-year-olds who used marijuana remained the same, reports of cannabis use disorder in that age group increased from 2.18 per cent to 2.72 per cent.

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Germany set to allow Huawei into 5G networks, defying pressure from the US

By: Chloe Taylor

Germany will not ban Chinese telecoms giant Huawei from helping to build its national 5G networks, snubbing calls from the U.S. to bar the company over national security concerns.

A spokesperson for Germany’s Interior Ministry confirmed in a phone call Wednesday that the decision had been made on Tuesday.

The move is a blow to the U.S., which has been pressuring its allies to exclude Huawei from 5G infrastructure, claiming its presence in the networks would enable Chinese espionage. Countries including Australia and New Zealand have already banned the company from their domestic networks.

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Bitcoin Underperforms as Investors’ Focus Remains on Brexit

By: Davit Babayan

The benchmark cryptocurrency slipped 0.12 percent to trade at $8,152.92, continuing its choppy actions seen after the last significant drop on September 24. The lack of upside bias in the bitcoin market was visible in the performance of rival cryptocurrencies. Almost all the top altcoins surged slightly against bitcoin on Wednesday, indicating traders’ conflict. Bitcoin SV, in particular, emerged as the top performer, rising more than 6 percent against bitcoin on a 24-hour live timeframe.

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In Maryland’s Medical Marijuana Industry, Minority Owners Say They’re Still Shut Out

By: Martin Austermuhle

After it became evident in 2016 that the winners of coveted licenses to grow and process medical marijuana in Maryland were almost all white, the state declared something of a do-over — it increased the number of possible licenses and said it would give minority-owned businesses and those based in economically disadvantaged areas a bump up in their attempt to get into the lucrative new industry.

But the new application process has been anything but smooth, and is currently being held up by a lawsuit alleging technical mishaps, as well as renewed complaints from minority entrepreneurs who say they’re being shut out by bigger out-of-state players who aren’t actually minority-owned.

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